Timothy Phillips's blog

Spring into Spring

I’ve mentioned many times in previous blogs that Spring is the time when we do our planting. If you didn’t follow through on New Year resolutions to attend to your wellness program this winter - especially this last intensely cold one, then you can be forgiven. Winter is a time for hibernation. Now that the snow is rapidly disappearing, it’s time to correct that imbalance and gain strength and flexibility so that you can enjoy the coming spring, summer and its accompanying outdoor activities.

Getting rid of that pesky cold

Sometimes despite taking all  preventable measures to get sick  (Vitamin C, Echinacea, Oil of Oregano, immune boosting tonics, frequent hand-washing, exercise, getting lots of rest, keeping at peak emotional high,)  we still get sick. Unless we chose to live our lives in isolation from the rest of the population in hermetically sealed caves, it is still hard to avoid. Here’s what I do to get better sooner.

Cold Prevention

Hopefully, I will not jinx myself and come down with a realIy bad cold infection this winter!  I have found a really effective way of staying well during the colds and flu season is the following:

Achilles Tendonitis - Prevention

With he approach of spring, we may turn our attention to the outdoors and its many activities.  It can be a mistake to do too much too soon without the requisite preparation otherwise injuries can easily happen.  It is not without reason that the Achilles heel has a place in Greek mythology emphasizing a serious weakness despite its overall strength.

The Future Job of Traditional Chinese Medicine Practitioners

The Future Job of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) Practitioners

by Paul Marchinko R.TCMP, R.AC.
Acupuncturist at Healing on the Danforth

Now that the New Year is well underway and society is rapidly moving forward, the job of a TCM practitioner is to find the balance between the promise of the future and the benefits of the past. Practitioners must remember the ancient ways and principles of the past theories of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) but negotiate them through the scientific method.

Taking care of the back

The discs of the spine are the cushioning between each of the vertebrae.  To some extent they are like the shock absorbers in a car and protect the body when we cross rough terrain.  The disc is mainly water and, as we age, the disc loses bulk.  With reduced padding, nerves are exposed resulting in pain.  In our early teen years, and maybe into our 20’s and early 30’s, we can abuse our bodies with all sorts of physical activity, contact sports, jumping out of planes, performing with the Cirque de Soleil and other activities more befitting a Navy Seal.     As we age we can get away with less

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Timothy Phillips's blog